Category Archives: people

Guided Tour part 2 – People

The other part of the site that has got the most attention is the sets of photos from Kings Road in Chelsea, taken between 1967 and 1975 -a time of such fantastic changes in the fashion scene – swinging 60s through to the less renowned 70s.BW_E025_23 BW_L028_14

However bad the 70s fashions got, it’s still a great record of what real people were wearing.

The one shot that always catches my eye is this one.
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The first thing I thought was “Bay City Rollers”, and you’d be so wrong. They hit it big in 1974-75-76, while this photo was taken in July 1973. Far from being trend-setters, they were a good 2 years behind the fashion.

Unfortunately there is nothing remotely like this to add to the “People” section – it’s basically the only street photography my dad ever did – and I’m not quite sure what else to add.

The obvious additions is a “Family” section – the big advantage of having all of his photos is that I am in control of all of the embarrassing ones! I could have great fun with this!
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There is perhaps the “Fat Frenchman” collection from the family holidays in the early 80s or quite a lot of bikini-clad young ladies from those same holidays.
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Some time travel experimentation

I had an email the other day from a chap called Paul Campbell, who had been looking at the King’s Road photos and had bit of a play with Google Street View – and look what he came up with.
Screen shot 2013-03-31 at 20.43.50 Screen shot 2013-03-31 at 11.31.18I’ve seen this sort of thing done before with things like wartime scenes, but these are really cool.

Thank you Paul, and do please let me know if you do any more and I’ll happily share them.

Exhibition

A few months ago I was contacted by the Proud Gallery in Chelsea to ask if they could use some of my dad’s photos in an upcoming exhibition based around Ossie Clark, the 1960’s fashion designer.

I am very pleased to say that from the 21st February to the 10th March, Proud Chelsea will be hosting “Ossie Clark: The King of the King’s Road Reigns Again”, featuring four of my dad’s photos. He would have been thrilled / stunned / gobsmacked to know that some of his pictures are being exhibited alongside the likes of Norman Parkinson’s, someone whose work he most definitely knew and liked.
There’s also a bit about it in Time Out.

The pictures are being made available to buy in a limited edition of 25 each – these are only available via the gallery.

Fairport Convention – Farewell Farewell

In the summer of 1979 we went to Fairport Convention’s last concert, at Cropredy in Oxfordshire. This has evolved into the Cropredy Festival, but at this time it was assumed that this would be it.

Derngate

In 1977 my father took a series of photos for Northampton High School, a private school for girls that at the time was based in Derngate, as part of their centenary celebrations – a number of the images appeared in their centenary magazine. I’m not quite sure how he got the gig though – quite possibly an amateur dramatics contact.

70s Wedding

These two are from a wedding in February 1975. You’d be able to guess when it’s from just by looking at it, wouldn’t you?

Portraits

During this period, my father was still going to the camera club, and there are quite a number of photos of young ladies who seem unable to keep all (and indeed sometimes any) of their clothes on.
This one is quite different, not least because it wasn’t that kind of photo session – I think she was a member of the theatre group.
 I think it’s rather a good picture – a bit unusual.

Bentley website

A new website has just gone live, featuring the John Lennon Bentley that my dad photographed on King’s Road in the late 1960s (see previous post). Rather than just focus on the car, the site also looks into the Swinging 60’s scene, and rather wonderfully it features a few of my dad’s photos. Take a look at http://beatlesbentley.com/, and my dad’s pics are in “The Place” and “The Time” sections, including the B&W shots of the car.

Thanks to Tanner and Marshall at the Slaughter Group in Birmingham, Alabama for finding the photos on Google and getting in touch.